How to construct a feature-style story

See the structure in action in PR, marketing, blog posts, more

How to construct a feature-style story

Going up! Here’s how to build a feature-style story that will boost readership, reading and joy. Image by Randy Fath

Organize a feature: beginning, middle & end

 Feature-style story form easy as 1-2-3

Feature-style story form easy as 1-2-3

Strathcona County masters ‘stack of boxes’ structure

Feature-style story structure is simple: Just stack three boxes.

PR features: Get the word out in releases

 This release hits home

This release hits home

Federal Home Loan Bank of Boston nails PR features

Home, sweet home: Mark Zelermyer turns a stodgy bank report into a friendly, fascinating feature-style story.


 doctors-orders-make-it-a-feature-release

Doctor’s orders: Make it a feature release

Physician association finds a cure for the pyramid

Rx for engagement: Add color and interest to your message with a feature release.

Internal comms features: Employee love ’em

 ‘From Tina Turner to Taylor Swift’

‘From Tina Turner to Taylor Swift’

Feature structure brings tedious topics to life

Add some sparkle to your story: Concrete details make messages more colorful.


Sensus goes to the science museum

Sensus goes to the science museum

Use the feature structure for emailed invitations

Midnight at the museum: Focus on what people will be able to do at your event, not on the event itself.


 Opioid crisis goes beyond the inverted pyramid

Opioid crisis goes beyond the inverted pyramid

WCB-Alberta uses feature structure to discuss addiction

Beyond news: Rethink your story with the feature-style story format.

Marketing features: three easy pieces

 Romance meets finance in this feature

Romance meets finance in this feature

Northern Trust goes beyond the pyramid

Couples learn how to handle special financial challenges in this marketing magazine feature.

Other features: Keep stacking the boxes

Stroke of editing: feature structure

Stroke of editing: feature structure

Ann audaciously takes on Jill Bolte Taylor’s bestseller

“Always grab the reader by the throat in the first paragraph, sink your thumbs into his windpipe in the second and hold him against the wall until the tag line.” — Paul O’Neil, former Time Inc. journalist


Get more tips on story structure writing tips on Rev Up Readership.


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