Benefits copy moves readers to act

Stop focusing on features

Benefits copy moves readers to act

To position your message in your readers’ best interest, lead with the benefits; substantiate with the features. Image by Fabian Blank

Identify the benefits: Make the translation

Make it F-A-B

Make it F-A-B

Lead with benefits, substantiate with features

Quick! Which would you rather have: Apple’s new incredibly responsive A9X chip? Or the ability to perform complex jobs like editing 4K video quickly and smoothly via your iPad?


Ask the right questions

Ask the right questions

Find benefits in the interview

Having trouble finding reader benefits? Maybe you need to ask different questions. Ask your subject matter experts: What happens if our customers buy this product or service?


‘That means you will …’

‘That means you will …’

Identify — and present — your benefits

Having trouble finding your benefits? Try prompting your subject matter expert with the line “that means they will …” The end of that sentence is likely to be a benefit.


Avoid fake benefits

Avoid fake benefits

‘Pat yourself on the back for choosing us’

“Clean your face,” demands a hotel soap wrapper. No, YOU clean YOUR face! I want to respond. I’ve been seeing a lot of messages like these: messages that sound like benefits but that really are not. Fake benefits.

 

Find the verb: The verb is the story

Write in verbs, not nouns

Write in verbs, not nouns

Your conference name is not a benefit

Remember Verb, the superhero on “Schoolhouse Rock”? He was great because he could do so many things. His theme song went like this:


Lists with benefits

Lists with benefits

Make them parallel, verb-based

When Mr. Wylie’s Writing Tips had a hip replacement recently, he had to take a break from grocery shopping. I went searching for my new BFF, an online grocery delivery service.


And … action!

And … action!

Write in verbs, not other parts of speech

Talk about painting a picture. In City of Bohane, Kevin Barry brings the titular town to life in sentences like this:


Quotes on verbs

Quotes on verbs

What writers and others say

“I am known for giving great verb.” — Jacqui Banaszynski, Pulitzer-prize winning journalist and visiting faculty member of The Poynter Institute

 

Lead with the benefits: Substantiate with the features

Catch a reader

Catch a reader

Focus on the reader’s needs

If you were giving away a Hawaiian vacation to people who signed up for your webinar, which would you lead with? The vacation, or the webinar?

 

More on benefits

Quotes on benefits

Quotes on benefits

What writers & others say

“Would you rather read a letter labeled ‘Dues Notice’ or ‘Get many new support, educational and marketing opportunities for the coming year’?” — Jeffrey Gitomer, principal of BuyGitomer Inc.

 

Get more tips on benefits copy on Rev Up Readership.


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