April 30, 2017

Quotes on humor

What writers and others say

“Life abounds with comedy if we will just look around us.”
— Mel Brooks, Emmy-, Grammy-, Oscar- and Tony Award-winning film director, screenwriter, composer, lyricist and producer

“There’s nothing so effective as a well rehearsed ad lib.”
— George Burns, American comedian, actor and writer

“When the news or topic is most serious, understate. When the topic is least serious, exaggerate.”
— Roy Peter Clark, Poynter Institute Senior Scholar

“Wit ought to be a glorious treat, like caviar; never spread it about like marmalade.”
— Noel Coward, English actor, playwright and composer

“Bad reality, good anecdote.”
— Carrie Fisher, American novelist, screenwriter and actress

“Dying is easy. Comedy is difficult.”
— Edmund Gwenn, English theatre and film actor

“One of the first rules of joke-telling also seems to apply when it comes to anecdotes — the better the punch line, the longer the story it can support. This may be why a Henny Youngman gag is worth no more than one line.”
— Jack Hart, editor at large of The Oregonian, in A Writer’s Coach

“It’s much easier to write a solemn book than a funny book. It’s harder to make people laugh than it is to make them cry. People are always on the verge of tears.”
— Fran Lebowitz, humorist, “a modern-day Dorothy Parker”

“A joke is like building a mousetrap from scratch. You have to work pretty hard to make the thing snap when it is suppose to snap.”
— Kurt Vonnegut, American novelist and wit, in A Man Without A Country
  • Master the Art of the Storyteller

    My husband likes to quote Anonymous, who said: “If a man speaks in the forest, and no woman is there to hear him, is he still wrong?”

    The corporate communication writer’s corollary: If you cover your terribly serious and important stories, and nobody pays attention, does your message still make a sound?

    In this creative-writing workshop, you’ll learn how to write copy that grabs attention, keeps it longer, communicates more clearly, enhances credibility and is more likely to go viral. You’ll walk away with techniques — not just what to do, but how — for painting pictures in your audience members’ minds so they understand your points faster, enjoy your information more and remember it longer.

    At New York creative writing workshopMaster the Art of the Storyteller — a two-day creative writing master class on Sept. 25-26 in New York — you’ll learn how to bring your messages to life with storytelling, wordplay and metaphor. Specifically, you’ll learn how to:

    • Grab Attention With Feature Stories: Craft creative leads and kickers.
    • Make Your Copy More Colorful: Engage readers with fun facts, juicy details.
    • Play With Your Words: Spice up your headlines, leads and sound bites with wordplay.
    • Master the Art of the Storyteller: Tap ‘the most powerful form of human communication’.
    • Add Meaning With Metaphor: Clarify complex concepts with analogy.
    • Edit, write, repeat: Bring your laptop and a story to work on, write and rewrite, get and give feedback, and leave with a totally rewritten piece.

    Learn more about the Master Class.

    Register for Master the Art of Storytelling Workshop in New York.


    Browse all upcoming Master Classes.

    Would you like to hold an in-house Make Your Copy More Creative workshop? Contact Ann directly.


%d bloggers like this: